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Looks Like There’s A New Sense Of Taste…And It’s For Carbs

It looks like research has revealed a new sense of taste in humans, and it’s for — you guessed it — carbs.

Until now, the consensus was that humans couldn’t detect the taste of carbs. The notion was that because carbs break down so rapidly, only a sweet taste was left over from the sugar molecules that make them up. So when we taste carbs, previous research suggested we only taste sweet. (source)

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Disease Prevention – The Shunned Science

Image of the cover of Modern Nutritional Diseases
This post excerpted and adapted from Chapter 3, Modern Nutritional Diseases

Diseases do not just happen.  Every disease has a cause, and once this cause is known, prevention is often the next most reasonable and cost-effective step.  –Anon.

The United States is in the midst of enormous epidemics of chronic debilitating diseases, the most important of which are cardiovascular diseases, type-2 diabetes, mental disorders, and cancer.  Attack rates of these diseases began increasing in the mid-20th century and have grown steadily since that time.  They are major causes of death in older adults, and, in recent years, their numbers have been rising in younger age groups.  Overall, these diseases are, by far, the major causes of disability and death in the United States.  More »

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Epidemiology, Rest in Peace

In the Beginning

Almost two hundred years ago, the methodology for investigating the occurrence and movement of infectious diseases in populations was born. It happened in London during the cholera epidemic of 1836 with the work of the English physician John Snow (1, p.246).   It was an era in which epidemics of infectious diseases caused by yet unidentified “things” were decimating populations throughout Europe.

Dr. Snow studied the eating and living habits of patients who had cholera and neighboring townspeople who did not have cholera for the purpose of identifying the similarities and differences between the groups. It is noteworthy that Dr. Snow examined people who did not get cholera as well as those who did. As a result of the current disregard in medical research of this practice of looking at both sick and non-sick people, important lessons available from subjects who are resistant to disease remain unrecognized.

Dr. Snow ultimately found a strong association between cases of cholera and a public well into which sewage was found to be draining. Dr. Snow requested that the pump handle of the offending well be removed. The immediate cessation of new cases of cholera was his proof that sewage-contaminated water was a cause of cholera.

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How Can Aspirin Help to Cure Cancer?

How can aspirin help to cure cancer?(1) This question is a consequence of long out-dated dogma of the medical establishment. The truth that puts a lie to this worn-out dogma has been available in the public domain for more than ten years.(2) The truth has been ignored, inadvertently or deliberately, by the medical establishment and by nutrition academia, which is medicine’s principal authority for nutritional ignorance and pseudoscience.
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Lowly Aspirin Versus NSAID Challengers

Introduction

In 1982, the Nobel Prize in Medicine was granted jointly to Sune Bergstrom, Bengt Samuelsson, and Sir John Vane, which, in essence, explained the mechanism for the analgesic effect of aspirin.

The Nobel Summary pointed out that prostaglandins and related substances constitute part of a new biological system formed from unsaturated fatty acids, primarily arachidonic acid.  It further noted that the Nobel Laureates had made fundamental contributions to the elucidation of the significance of this new biological system in which aspirin was shown to block the synthesis of the prostaglandins.

“Thanks to this important discovery [of] the mode of action of aspirin, the most frequently used drug all over the world, was clarified. It also provided the prostaglandin researchers with a useful tool in their analyses of the role of these compounds in various biological processes”(1).  Thus began a new chapter in the century-old saga of aspirin.

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A Tale of Two Truths

Herein you will find an account of two truths of optimum human nutrition that are slowly emerging from a huge mix of nutrition literature that clouds rather than clarifies a fundamental field of study.  These two truths, also known as natural laws, evolved in the Beginning together with prehistoric Man.  Through this bond between diet and Man was forged the dietary pattern that established Man’s basic requirementsh for optimum health.  These tales of truth have been passed on to us through contacts from sundry sources.
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Of Mice and Men – Part II, and Red Meat! The Hype, the Horror!

Although in the past I confessed to and made amends with mice research in obesity, I still have harbored skepticism. Mice are the gold standard! They reproduce quickly, live just long enough for experiments, and are all around a model organism.

Much model. Wow.

But… they are not humans. Genetically similar, but still a rodent. Right? No no, now I am sounding scientifically illiterate. You’re right, they’re good. Are they? Yes. Yes?

Well finally it comes to the day where my misgivings may be vindicated. I feel a little relieved honestly. I hate being at conflict inside but I think it may be common among anyone with critical thinking capacity.
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Research: Increased sugar uptake promotes oncogenesis via EPAC/RAP1 and O-GlcNAc pathways

We’ve been providing a fair bit of coverage on cancer recently, and today will be no exception.

Unfortunately, right now I can offer little more than a pointer to the research article (published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation). I’m still working my way through it and may not have the time to return. So if you’re interested in sharing your thoughts on it, please add to the comments below!
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Metformin Improves Health and Longevity in Mice

We’ve discussed Metformin a number of times before, so the news from this latest research caught my eye:

long-term treatment with metformin (0.1% w/w in diet) starting at middle age extends healthspan and lifespan in male mice, while a higher dose (1% w/w) was toxic. Treatment with metformin mimics some of the benefits of calorie restriction, such as improved physical performance, increased insulin sensitivity, and reduced low-density lipoprotein and cholesterol levels without a decrease in caloric intake.

This isn’t the first time researchers have witnessed such beneficial effects, but the challenge is, of course, in understanding what significance this recent mouse study has for humans.

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