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The Deeper Roots of Health and Diet – Ron Rosedale (AHS12)

Dr. Rosedale’s presentation at Ancestral Health Symposium 2012 (AHS12) is not great. But it is damn good. In his talk, he takes the long view on a lot of nutrition topics. In this context, you might expect “the long view” to mean 10 million years or so… but no, he takes the long looong loooooooooong view. As in, ~4 billion years long. He starts from the earliest forms of life on Earth and walks us up to the present, touching on various implications for nutrition along the way.
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Dear Volek and Phinney, Y U Disappoint Me?

I stumbled across this journal article the other day. At first I was intrigued and a bit excited; sometimes reviews have some tidbits of information or put together a new perspective from research papers in a particular area. However for any low-carb veterans I would ultimately rule this paper as uninspiring, at best. And, at worst, likely intended as a targeted book advertisement for Phinney and Volek’s book, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living. (Which, BTW, is one of the best low carb resources in print. Don’t get me wrong about that, I just hate it when authors end a paper peddling one of their products.)
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Cancer As A Metabolic Disease – Thomas Seyfried

Image of the cover of the book, Cancer As A Metabolic Disease, by Thomas Seyfried
Cancer As A Metabolic Disease, by Thomas N. Seyfried
Browse on Amazon!

Some people lust after cars, or wealth, or beautiful things. Apparently, I’m demented enough to lust after books.

But what a book…

I’ve been following Seyfried for quite a while now. His talk at Ancestral Health Symposium 2013 (AHS13) is renowned. His research, promising. And his interviews, fascinating.

Cancer As A Metabolic Disease is Seyfried’s treatise on the subject, his omnibus on the subject. In it, he builds upon the concepts first articulated by Otto Warburg (of, “The Warburg Effect” fame) and covers insights gleaned from decades of research in his own lab at Boston College.
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New Research On Heart Hormones And Their Influence On Lipolysis

Brown. Fat.

Well that doesn’t sound particularly lovely, or interesting in the least bit. But to your average obesity researcher this is one of the hottest topics on the board right now. Brown is the new black, so to speak.

We’ve known for years that there are a couple different types of fat- your average lazy storage site white fat, and the active, heat-producing brown fat. Brown fat has a unique uncoupling protein (UCP1) that gets upregulated every time the sympathetic nervous system starts cranking out the catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine). But there has turned out to be another player, a second hand in the brown fat pot.
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Robert Lustig on NPR’s Science Friday

Image of the cover of the book, by Robert Lustig
Fat Chance by Robert H. Lustig, M.D.
Wow, any more of these and it might just be easier to have a single post with links to all the places where Robert Lustig has appeared on promoting his new book, Fat Chance.

At any rate, here he is with Ira Flatow on NPR’s Science Friday (one of my favorite shows!). Give it a listen!

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Robert Lustig on Diane Rehms Show

Image of the cover of the book, by Robert Lustig
Fat Chance by Robert H. Lustig, M.D.
Hot on the heels of the publication of Fat Chance, Diane Rehms interviews Robert Lustig for nearly an hour on his new book and the theories that underlie it.

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Lustig is in familiar form during his interview, and covers and expounds on the high points that may be familiar to you from his viral video, Sugar: The Bitter Truth.
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Robert Lustig Interviewed About Fat Chance on Jimmy Moore’s LLVLC Show

Image of the cover of the book, by Robert Lustig
Fat Chance by Robert H. Lustig, M.D.
Jimmy Moore is the man in the know in the low carb community, and so it comes as no surprise that he was able to hook up with Dr. Robert Lustig for an interview on his new book, Fat Chance.

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If you’ve seen his renowned video, Sugar: The Bitter Truth, you’ll recognize many of the themes in this interview.
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