9

Fight Cancer With A Ketogenic Diet – Ellen Davis

Image of the cover of the book, "Fight Cancer With A Ketogenic Diet"
Browse on author’s website
A very welcome stroke of luck brought us a copy of the eBook Fight Cancer with a Ketogenic Diet, 2nd Edition by Ellen Davis. It was a joy to read because of its timeliness, accuracy, and its clarity. It is written in a clear and straightforward fashion that could only come from the pen of a scholar proficient in nutritional science.

You will find Ms. Davis’ book far more instructive than the 5-star-only-diet-book-you-will-ever-need volumes on amazon.com or the well-touted, best selling diet books in book stores. Ms. Davis’ book is available on an informative website dedicated to helping people regain health through ketogenesis (www.ketogenic-diet-resource.com).
More »

18

Red Meat and Miss Information

Red meat has long been an anathema to the nutrition establishment. Not being privy to the thinking of the originators of the so-called heart-healthy diet, we assumed it was because of the association of meat with its burden of saturated fat and cholesterol, two food components condemned as promoters of heart disease.
More »

11

Prevention of Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancers

Recent biochemical research into the metabolism of the essential fatty acids seems to have uncovered a major underlying cause of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. This biochemistry tells us that this cause is the modern American diet and that simple dietary change is capable of preventing these cancers.

Finding the cause of a disease and then removing that cause is called primary disease prevention; the disease never occurs and wellness is continuously maintained. In recent years, this definition has been changed to mean preventive medical care, namely early diagnosis and treatment. This new type of prevention utilizes regular medical checkups aimed at early diagnosis. Thus, when a disease reaches the point where it can be diagnosed, the disease is managed by regular doctor visits, prescription drugs, and surgery. This is not primary prevention.
More »

15

The Importance of Dietary Animal Fat

THE IMPORTANCE OF DIETARY ANIMAL FAT1

Animal fat was evolutionary man’s major source of energy. Ancient humans lived primarily on eggs, fish, animals, and other living creatures. Dietary sources of glucose were minimal. Human biochemistry is in agreement with these paleolithic findings.

In contrast, the modern human uses two classes of food to provide energy for life functions; carbohydrates yield glucose, and fats supply fatty acids. Despite the fact that glucose serves as the usual and ready source of energy for the body, long-term sustained energy depends on fatty acids. Fatty acids are a much more efficient fuel than glucose. They contain twice the energy per unit weight and they are stored more compactly. Under normal conditions, the body uses both fuels alternately depending on time from last meal.
More »

3

The New Epidemiology

Since shortly after World War II, when Ancel Keys and wife Margaret concluded that diets high in animal fat were the cause of cardiovascular diseases, an inestimable number of large, long-term studies have been conducted worldwide to look for proof of a causal relationship between the two. Despite a tremendous expenditure of time and money, all studies have failed to give an answer to the question of whether animal fats (primarily from red meat) and cholesterol cause cardiovascular disease. This failure is blamed on the inadequacies of epidemiology rather than the difficulties of proving a negative. When properly conducted, epidemiology has no inadequacies. Any failure of epidemiology is that of modern epidemiologists who equate association with cause.
More »
14

The Dose Makes The Poison

When I started work as Public Health Toxicologist with the California Department of Public Health a little more than fifty years ago, the word “toxic” was seldom heard much less used as a topic of conversation. In recent years, the word has been discovered and become a fashionable adjective for a wide variety of undesirable things.

This has bothered me because ‘toxic’ has a very specific meaning that makes it an unacceptable adjective to use except when applied to harmful chemicals. Its use otherwise only confuses people and needlessly frightens them. I usually ignore the matter, but when specific foods are labeled as toxic, I can no longer remain silent.
More »

0

Lustig, the EFSA, Fructose, and Poison

Just a quick note to point to Robert Lustig’s recent article in The Guardian: Fructose: The Poison Index.

It’s typical Lustig. Written on the occasion of The European Food and Safety Agency’s (EFSA) ruling that allows food processors and mongers to make health claims about the fructose content of their foods.

And yet the scientific data on fructose says it is one of the most egregious components of the western diet, directly contributing to heart disease and diabetes, and associated with cancer and dementia. Nature magazine has just published a scathing indictment of fructose by Dr Lewis Cantley, one of the US’s leading cancer researchers. But the EFSA says it sees no harm, justifying its stance on the basis that fructose has a lower glycaemic index than glucose.

Resources

2

Robert Lustig’s ‘Fat Chance: Fructose 2.0′

Robert Lustig attempts to reprise his viral hit, Sugar the Bitter Truth with a new installment. This one borrows part of the title from his book: “Fat Chance: Fructose 2.0″.

As you might expect, it’s a pretty darn good view. Favorite quote? How ’bout this: “It’s never gluttony and sloth. It’s always biochemical. The question is, ‘Are you smart enough to figure out what the biochemistry is?'”

For those of you interested in Leptin, this is a must watch.

2

The Changing Understanding of Fats

I consider myself to be as fortunate as I am frustrated to witness the current revolution in our understanding of the role of fats in proper nutrition and health. The tide seems to be turning and we’re returning from whence we came. Every week, it seems, someone else is questioning the “fat is bad” orthodoxy, and medical practitioners are speaking out.

This week it’s the British Medical Journal, and I have Alice and Fred Ottoboni to thank for pointing it out to me.

When they say, “This is important…”, I tend to listen.
More »

0

President Taft Lost 60lbs on Low Carb

Watching this story sourced from the Annals of Internal Medicine make the rounds on the newswires…

President William Howard Taft, the country’s heaviest commander in chief and a high-profile yo-yo dieter in his day, lost 60 pounds in the early 1900s on a low-carb diet with the help of a diet doctor. (source)

More »