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Research: Increased sugar uptake promotes oncogenesis via EPAC/RAP1 and O-GlcNAc pathways

We’ve been providing a fair bit of coverage on cancer recently, and today will be no exception.

Unfortunately, right now I can offer little more than a pointer to the research article (published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation). I’m still working my way through it and may not have the time to return. So if you’re interested in sharing your thoughts on it, please add to the comments below!
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A Biochemical Outline of a Cure for Cancer

The term “aerobic glycolysis” is confusing to biochemists because it is inherently contradictory. Aerobic refers to reactions that require oxygen, and anaerobic refers to reactions that take place without the need for oxygen. Glycolysis is a biochemical pathway that does not need or use oxygen, therefore it is anaerobic. The definitions of aerobic and anaerobic shed no light on why glycolysis is described as aerobic.
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Fight Cancer With A Ketogenic Diet – Ellen Davis

Image of the cover of the book, "Fight Cancer With A Ketogenic Diet"
Browse on author’s website
A very welcome stroke of luck brought us a copy of the eBook Fight Cancer with a Ketogenic Diet, 2nd Edition by Ellen Davis. It was a joy to read because of its timeliness, accuracy, and its clarity. It is written in a clear and straightforward fashion that could only come from the pen of a scholar proficient in nutritional science.

You will find Ms. Davis’ book far more instructive than the 5-star-only-diet-book-you-will-ever-need volumes on amazon.com or the well-touted, best selling diet books in book stores. Ms. Davis’ book is available on an informative website dedicated to helping people regain health through ketogenesis (www.ketogenic-diet-resource.com).
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Prevention of Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancers

Recent biochemical research into the metabolism of the essential fatty acids seems to have uncovered a major underlying cause of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. This biochemistry tells us that this cause is the modern American diet and that simple dietary change is capable of preventing these cancers.

Finding the cause of a disease and then removing that cause is called primary disease prevention; the disease never occurs and wellness is continuously maintained. In recent years, this definition has been changed to mean preventive medical care, namely early diagnosis and treatment. This new type of prevention utilizes regular medical checkups aimed at early diagnosis. Thus, when a disease reaches the point where it can be diagnosed, the disease is managed by regular doctor visits, prescription drugs, and surgery. This is not primary prevention.
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Cancer as a Metabolic Disease – Update on Metastasis

Image of the cover of the book, Cancer As A Metabolic Disease, by Thomas Seyfried
Cancer as a Metabolic Disease, by Thomas N. Seyfried
Browse on Amazon!
I know I just published my review of Cancer as a Metabolic Disease, but I stumbled across some news that I thought was worth relating.

One of the most beautifully written and compelling parts of Seyfried’s exhaustive hypothesis is the idea that metastasis is too complex of a process to be accounted for by random genetic mutation. The idea that many different types of cancer cells would all somehow collect the right genetic mutations that would make them able to enter and exit tissues, evade detection by the immune system, and spread throughout the body seems ludicrous. From the very beginnings of Cancer as a Metabolic Disease, Seyfried begins to question this and show how the process of metastasis involves abilities already present in some macrophages and leukocytes:
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