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Metabolic Energy Control

The metabolic energy control system of the human organism is designed to be fueled by either glucose (carbohydrates) or fatty acids (lipids).1, pp. 160  In a healthy individual, the fuel of choice is largely determined by diet composition and intake schedule.  Because food intake is a batch process for most people, the availability of food in the digestive system cycles daily through full, empty, full, and so forth.  Thus, for a diet in which the macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids) are consistent and in reasonable proportion, it is customary for the choice of fuel to switch back and forth seamlessly between glucose and fatty acids during the day in response to the alimentation cycles.
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A Biochemical Outline of a Cure for Cancer

The term “aerobic glycolysis” is confusing to biochemists because it is inherently contradictory. Aerobic refers to reactions that require oxygen, and anaerobic refers to reactions that take place without the need for oxygen. Glycolysis is a biochemical pathway that does not need or use oxygen, therefore it is anaerobic. The definitions of aerobic and anaerobic shed no light on why glycolysis is described as aerobic.
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Red Meat and Miss Information

Red meat has long been an anathema to the nutrition establishment. Not being privy to the thinking of the originators of the so-called heart-healthy diet, we assumed it was because of the association of meat with its burden of saturated fat and cholesterol, two food components condemned as promoters of heart disease.
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10

Prevention of Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancers

Recent biochemical research into the metabolism of the essential fatty acids seems to have uncovered a major underlying cause of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. This biochemistry tells us that this cause is the modern American diet and that simple dietary change is capable of preventing these cancers.

Finding the cause of a disease and then removing that cause is called primary disease prevention; the disease never occurs and wellness is continuously maintained. In recent years, this definition has been changed to mean preventive medical care, namely early diagnosis and treatment. This new type of prevention utilizes regular medical checkups aimed at early diagnosis. Thus, when a disease reaches the point where it can be diagnosed, the disease is managed by regular doctor visits, prescription drugs, and surgery. This is not primary prevention.
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The Importance of Dietary Animal Fat

THE IMPORTANCE OF DIETARY ANIMAL FAT1

Animal fat was evolutionary man’s major source of energy. Ancient humans lived primarily on eggs, fish, animals, and other living creatures. Dietary sources of glucose were minimal. Human biochemistry is in agreement with these paleolithic findings.

In contrast, the modern human uses two classes of food to provide energy for life functions; carbohydrates yield glucose, and fats supply fatty acids. Despite the fact that glucose serves as the usual and ready source of energy for the body, long-term sustained energy depends on fatty acids. Fatty acids are a much more efficient fuel than glucose. They contain twice the energy per unit weight and they are stored more compactly. Under normal conditions, the body uses both fuels alternately depending on time from last meal.
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3

The New Epidemiology

Since shortly after World War II, when Ancel Keys and wife Margaret concluded that diets high in animal fat were the cause of cardiovascular diseases, an inestimable number of large, long-term studies have been conducted worldwide to look for proof of a causal relationship between the two. Despite a tremendous expenditure of time and money, all studies have failed to give an answer to the question of whether animal fats (primarily from red meat) and cholesterol cause cardiovascular disease. This failure is blamed on the inadequacies of epidemiology rather than the difficulties of proving a negative. When properly conducted, epidemiology has no inadequacies. Any failure of epidemiology is that of modern epidemiologists who equate association with cause.
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Modern Nutritional Diseases, 2nd. Edition is Here!

Image of the cover of Modern Nutritional Diseases
Browse on Amazon!
It is with great joy that I receive word directly from Alice and Fred Ottoboni that Modern Nutritional Diseases, 2nd. Edition is available for purchase from Amazon. As you may remember, the first edition of Modern Nutritional Diseases had a profound impact on my understanding of nutrition and its relationship to health. The second edition is revised and updated, and is sure to be a must have for anyone looking to get into the science behind nutrition.

It’s also worth noting that Alice and Fred have been exceedingly gracious in their willingness to share their intellectual property with readers of Ketopia. Let’s wish them great success with this recent edition of their masterwork!
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5

Aspirin: A Unique Remedy

Abstract

In the course of research into the biochemistry and physiology of the endpoints of essential fatty acid metabolism known as eicosanoids, the mechanism by which aspirin exerts its analgesic effect was revealed. It is now known that aspirin does not prevent the COX enzyme from converting arachidonic acid to pain-producing proinflammatory eicosanoids as had long been assumed, but rather it modifies the COX enzyme by acetylating it thereby making it convert arachidonic acid to antiinflammatory eicosanoids. During these same research activities, hitherto unknown classes of naturally occurring, anti-inflammatory, pro-healing eicosanoids known as lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, neuroprotectins, and maresins were discovered. Aspirin was found to multiply many times the healing power of these natural lipid mediators by creating aspirin-triggered counterparts to all.
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